MULTIGRAIN FLOUR FOR ROTI/CHAPATTI

Chapatti or roti is a staple in Indian cuisine and is eaten daily alongside various dishes. Homemade Multigrain Atta is a brilliant addition to your chapatti atta because you can incorporate so many health benefits, giving you the wholesome goodness of 6 different grains.

Mixed multigrain flour for roti/chapatti is in a beige bowl with a wooden scoop




HOMEMADE MULTIGRAIN ATTA 


WHAT IS MULTIGRAIN ATTA?

Multigrain flour is a combination of multiple different grains that have been ground into a fine flour. 

Often when buying readymade Multigrain atta, you get a bag of wholemeal flour mixed with multigrain flours. The ratio of multigrain flour to wholemeal atta is usually very small in these readymade bags so making your own at home and mixing at home is definitely more worthwhile! 

WHAT ARE THE GRAINS IN MULTIGRAIN FLOUR?

Six different grain flours in small six glass bowls



The beauty of multigrain atta is that you can add different flours according to your availability and preference. Often, allergies may be a contributing factor.

In our atta, we like to add 6 different grains. 

These grains are:

1. Chickpea Flour - also known as besan or gram flour. It is made from ground chickpeas. This flour is gluten-free and is high in fiber, low in fat and sugar. 

We love to make these Besan masala Roti using chickpea flour.

2. Sorghum Flour or Jowar Flour as it is also known - Sorghum flour is from ground wholegrain sorghum or pseudo-grain. It can be used in a similar way to quinoa with a slightly sweet flavor. It is a whole grain flour that is high in fiber.

Check out one of the most popular posts Oats, Jowar Methi Thepla

3. Soya Flour - made from grinding roasted yellow soya beans, soya flour is rich in protein. The taste varies from mildly sweet to nutty

4. Quinoa Flour - made by grinding quinoa seeds to a fine consistency. This flour has a similar resemblance to all-purpose wheat flour but has a high protein and fiber content

5. Pearl Millet Flour or Bajri/Bajra Flour - this flour is greyish in colour and has a nutty flavour. The flour has a high nutritional value as it is high in protein and minerals. It is also gluten-free. It can be used to make Bajri na Rotla

6. Barley Flour - barley flour is high in soluble fiber and contains vitamins and minerals. It had a mild nutty flavour. Barley flour is known as Jav flour/atta in Hindi/Gujarati. 


Please note - in our image, we have only shown 5 as this is what we had available at the time

HEALTH BENEFITS OF MULTIGRAIN ATTA 

Multigrain atta or flour has a myriad of health benefits and it is definitely worth incorporating into your diet. 

Each grain provides its own individual nutritional benefit so the combined benefit is even more spectacular!

✅Protein-packed - each flour has a high protein content so this flour is a great way to add more protein into your diet and reduce the level of carbohydrate in your daily chapattis. 

✅Rich in dietary fiber 

✅Rotis made with multigrain atta keeps you full for longer

✅Low GI - the high protein and low carb combination make this flour low GI. It is a better choice than white or brown chapattis particularly for those with diabetes. 

✅Low in saturated fats - reducing the levels of saturated fats contributes to the maintenance of normal cholesterol levels.

✅Suitable for vegetarians and vegans

HOW CAN I USE MULTIGRAIN ATTA? 


Multigrain atta can be mixed with your regular chapatti atta when making the dough.  The beauty of multigrain atta is that it will not affect the softness of your rotis. The atta provides a full earthy flavour and wonderful texture to chapattis. 

We mix 3 parts chapatti atta with 1 part multigrain atta for the perfect taste and texture for us as a household. 

We then follow the method of making round and soft Gujarati rotlis which go brilliantly daily with a curry or sabji and daal. 

We also love using multigrain atta to make Multigrain Dudhi Thepla and Multigrain Butternut Squash Achari Thepla.

Add basic spices such as red chilli, turmeric powder, finely chopped onion, chillies and coriander to this flour and make delicious Masala multigrain roti. 

We also use this flour to make healthy multi flour crackers 

WHERE CAN I FIND MULTIGRAIN FLOUR? 

These separate flours are fairly easy to find, you just need to do a little research. 

Online health food shops will stock these flours. 

I have seen some flours available in high street health food shops also.

Indian grocery stores tend to also stock these flours in 1kg packets and are usually reasonably priced. 

CAN I ADD ANY OTHER GRAIN FLOUR?

Definitely, you can, you can add oats, ragi, buckwheat, or cornmeal flour.

HOW TO SERVE MULTIGRAIN FLOUR ROTIS/CHAPATTIS?


We eat this multigrain rotlis the same way as eating any normal chapatti. Sometimes we use it as tortilla wrap for many dishes. 

If any leftovers we air fry them to make them crispy and enjoy them as a healthy snack. 

STORAGE

We love these multigrain flour rotis when they are made fresh. They stay fresh and soft in the airtight container for 6-8 hours if ghee is spread on top. 

The Foodie Bag

For the imagery for this post, we have used a backdrop from the Instagram Bag from Paper Bag Co. They kindly gifted us The Foodie Bag which includes:

a limited edition stylish black tote bag with an internal pocket, mesh divider and zip closure to carry your kit
a 5-in-1 15 inch pop up reflector
8 postcard set with handy photography tips
and 4 photographic backdrops in 4 stunning designs

I just love the different designs of the backdrops - each one is unique yet so versatile that they can be used to style a variety of different dishes! The beauty of these backdrops is that they can be so easily stored away in the roll provided. 

I highly recommend trying The Instagram Bag or gifting it to a friend who loves food photography!

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN MULTIGRAIN FLOUR?

1. Take 1 cup of each flour in a big mixing bowl.

2. Mix well them together.

3. Store it in an airtight jar or container. 

HOW TO MAKE MULTIGRAIN ROTI?

A collage of step by step pictures of multigrain roti


1. Mix 1 cup of multigrain atta with 3 cups of normal chapatti atta in a mixing bowl.

2. Add sufficient lukewarm water and knead the soft and pliable dough.

3. Cover it with a clean kitchen napkin and keep it aside for 10-12 minutes.

4. Add 1 tsp. oil then knead the dough again for a minute.

5. Then divide the dough into equal lemon size balls.

6. Heat a griddle/Tawa on medium heat. Dip the ball in dry flour, make round rotis using a rolling pin.

7. Cook on the hot griddle, Once very light brown spots appear on the lower surface, flip the roti using a tong. 

8. Let the other side cook longer until brown spots appear. 

9. Now using a tong, lift the roti and remove it from the Tawa and carefully put the roti on the direct flame. 

10. Let the roti fluff up, if for some reason it doesn't fluff up just remove it and don't let it burn.

11. Spread the ghee (optional)

12. Serve hot.

Overhead shot of Multigrain flour, it is placed in a ceramic bowl with a wooden scoop

ENJOY MULTIGRAIN ATTA/FLOUR ROTIS WITH THESE DELICIOUS DAALS AND CURRYS






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multigrain flour, multigrain atta, multigrain roti, healthy flours
Mains
American, Indian
Yield: 6 CUPS
Author: Hayley Dhanecha
MULTIGRAIN FLOUR FOR CHAPATTI/ROTI

MULTIGRAIN FLOUR FOR CHAPATTI/ROTI

Homemade Multigrain Atta is a brilliant addition to your chapatti atta because you can incorporate so many health benefits, giving you the wholesome goodness of 6 different grains.
Prep time: 5 MinTotal time: 5 Min

Ingredients

1 cup = 250ml
  • 1 cup soya flour (100g)
  • 1 cup chickpea flour (100g)
  • 1 cup sorghum flour (136g)
  • 1 cup pearl millet flour (120)
  • 1 cup quinoa flour (120g)
  • 1 cup barley flour (150g)

Instructions

  1. Add all the flours to a big mixing bowl.
  2. Mix all of them using a whisker.
  3. Store it in a jar.

Notes:

You may add other flours such as oats or ragi.

Nutrition Facts

Calories

437.13

Fat (grams)

4.28

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.57

Carbs (grams)

85.48

Fiber (grams)

8.05

Net carbs

77.43

Sugar (grams)

2.64

Protein (grams)

14.64

Sodium (milligrams)

13.55

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00

The nutritional information provided is an approximation calculated by an online calculator. Please consult a professional dietitian for nutritional advice.

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30 comments

  1. HI JAGRUTI,
    VERY GOOD POST AND PERFECT FOR OUR EVENT THEME. GREAT ONE,

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  2. Very healthy option Jagruti.. we don't get shorghum, bajra , jowar here.. but we do get soya flour..I will check out in the market for some other options.

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  3. good info shared....love the home made multigrain....great post...

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  4. I love millet flour - it looks a funny grey colour but it's so tasty!

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  5. Such an informative post, love it. Will check your blog for more recipes. Thanks so much for sharing this.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Jenny, hope you find something what you like :)

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  6. Wow, so many different flours in here! I'm sure this would taste amazing! Saving it for later, thanks so much for the recipe :)

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  7. Such a great blend here. I love that it can be customized according to diet preference. There's nothing like baking up fresh roti/chapati.

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  8. I love chickpea and quinoa flours but I've never used sourgum" Can't wait to give this blend a try, it's always fun to make your own flours at home

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    Replies
    1. And when you make stuff at home, you know what exactly goes in your tummy :)

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  9. I can't wait to give this recipe a try. I love the flour mixture and I'm sure it will make awesome roti.

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  10. Wow, I've never thought to make my own multigrain flour before. I wonder how this would work in a bread since I love baking a loaf every week!

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  11. What a great post! I love various flour mixtures and cannot wait to try this! It's been forever since I've made roti because I haven't found a great flour blend. This is perfect! Thank you!

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  12. Healthy and versatile flour mixture. We've been making our multigrain atta for eons.. well actually for years since my FIL was diabetic. Have used it not only for roti, parathas but also for pooris.

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  13. Such an informative post, I am using multigrain flour since 6 months because I am diabetic I can't wait to give this recipe to try. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Let us know how you get on with this recipe?

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  14. I usually cook with multi-grain flour but that is always the store bought one. Never thought of making my own. Now no more purchasing and all thanks to you.

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  15. Great recipe. I also prefer making multi grain roti but always buy ready made multi grain aata from the market. From now onwards, I will also make it at home. Thanks for sharing this recipe

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  16. Great recipe. I also prefer making multi grain roti but always buy ready made multi grain aata from the market. From now onwards, I will also make it at home. Thanks for sharing this recipe

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  17. Making homemade multigrain flour sounds amazing. I have most of the flours on hand and would love to make this very soon.

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  18. I agree we get lots of nutrition and it is good for diabetic people as well. I use jowar and quinoa flour along with atta flour.

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  19. Such a healthy and hearty combination of flours! I love multi-grain flatbreads and make my own mix. Like your idea of adding quinoa flour too to our desi mix! will try this next time!

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  20. Really worth of multigrain atta at home instead of buying those pricy bags. Thank you for sharing the portions of each flour to make this.

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  21. Back in India I had the option of getting the atta milled with the combination I liked. Once I had migrated, that stopped so we started blending our mix with flours. I love the way soft roti rolls out with the multigrain atta. I am glad to see your post on the same topic.

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